The Tour 2022 (P): St. Ives, Cornwall

Cornwall Coast

The best way to approach St. Ives is via the coastal path. Unless you dislike grey stones, green plants or blue sea. Wonderful weather might be even more of a cliché (never seen one of those “Rosamunde Pilcher TV movies” on German TV, but might look just like this), still, with Andy joining, we decide to endure it all.

On our Way

Outlooks are fantastic and we enjoy every step and the bright colours around.

Coastal Path
blue – grey – green and shades in between

In fact, I could show about a dozen pictures just from the coastal path, each of it looking splendid.

…adding flowers to the picture postcard

However, sooner or later we should look at St. Ives. Beaches, narrow roads, shops and museums – just the quantity of restaurants does not meet the requirements, anything else is just fine.

Getting there: St. Ives

Surfing would be one of the classical activities, if only they had some waves. First days of June, the sea is quiet and flat. Even without the black-white flag (indicates the surfing area), nobody would be run over by a full-speed-surfer.

…und wenn die Erde nun doch eine Scheibe ist?

With my surf board parked in a half-hour walking distance from the beach, I can easily smile at the untroubled surface of the sea.

One thing hardly ever mentioned is the typical Cornish village style: Wherever houses meat the coastline, all is built with the utmost effectiveness and no regard to proportions or beauty.

Better to ignore houses and villages on touristic pictures

When walking through St. Ives, I cannot confirm that the town is attractive. Still, with a good angle, pictures tend to show the best parts of it.

Idyllic low tide image
Headland and picturesque chapel
Idyllic high tide image (same same, but different)

The beach close to the train station is the calmest one, luring us into a cup of coffee with the feet in the sand. However, the ultimate, perfect image comes when passing by crystal-clear water decorated with a bulk of seagulls.

sic!

Just behind, we detect a small church with the most inviting garden café. We manage to defend our cup of tea and gluten-free cheesecake against the gulls before we continue our way through the village.

Outdoor Café

Next on our list is: art. Sculptures of Barbara Hepworth, shown in her former house and in the charming garden.

Barbara Hepworth Sculptures

Between Hepworth and Tate Gallery, we enjoy the re-usage of historic farm buildings on Hellesveor Campsite. It is a clear recommendation for St. Ives due to wonderful owners and the nice overall setting.

Hellesveor Holiday Park, St. Ives

Another day brings us down to the Tate St. Ives, located in a former gasometer. The building competes with neatly curated exhibitions, and the café on the 3rd floor is also worth a visit.

Tate St. Ives

Inner views are colourful, especially with the current exhibition of Ad Minoliti.

Ad Minoliti Art

Still, in the end I spend endless time looking out of the building onto the main beach. It is framed artfully by the rotunda of the building.

Tate St. Ives, Inside-Out

Compared to my French West coast experience, St. Ives main beach is on an OK-level only. Yet, with today’s light and weather, it turns out like the most wonderful image of a Cornwall beach.

Pastel shaded Beach Today

Especially, when (again) taking the picture inside-out from the Tate.

Finally, we have seen it all and it is time to move on. Having had one rainy day out of three makes us re-design our next steps: South will be the direction of choice. Let’s see if we can soak in some sun when going as South as UK can be.

…btw: Guess who’s taking pictures…

The Picture Lady